Question: What Is The Difference Between Metonymy And Synecdoche In The Following Sentences?

Which is the best example of metonymy in the poem?

“He writes a fine hand” (meaning good handwriting) “The pen is mightier than the sword” (meaning literary power is superior to military force) “The House was called to order” (meaning the members in the House).

Is lend me your ears metonymy?

A familiar Shakespearean example is Mark Antony’s speech in Julius Caesar in which he asks of his audience: “Lend me your ears.” Metonymy is closely related to synecdoche, the naming of a part for the whole or a whole for the part, and is a common poetic device.

What is the purpose of metonymy?

The purpose of a metonymy is generally to focus the rhetorical emphasis of a reference to an object on a specific quality of that object.

How do you write a metonymy?

In order to write a metonymy,Examine a sentence for a phrase which can be shortened or replaced with a defining characteristic or associated idea.Replace the phrase with the metonymic phrase.

What does hyperbole mean?

extravagant exaggeration: extravagant exaggeration (such as “mile-high ice-cream cones”)

What is difference between metonymy and synecdoche?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech referring to when a part of something is used to refer to the whole, such as in the phrase “all hands on deck,” where “hands” are people. … ‘Synecdoche’ is when a part of something is used to refer to the whole. ‘Metonymy’ is when something is used to represent something related to it.

What is the purpose of a synecdoche?

Synecdoche is used to sound more colloquial and to mirror everyday language. This helps a speaker connect with his audience to achieve his purpose.

What is an example of a synecdoche?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech in which, most often, a part of something is used to refer to its whole. For example, “The captain commands one hundred sails” is a synecdoche that uses “sails” to refer to ships—ships being the thing of which a sail is a part.

What is an example of a chiasmus?

Chiasmus is a figure of speech in which the grammar of one phrase is inverted in the following phrase, such that two key concepts from the original phrase reappear in the second phrase in inverted order. The sentence “She has all my love; my heart belongs to her,” is an example of chiasmus.

Is lend me your ears synecdoche or metonymy?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech where a part of something is used for the whole or vice versa. Therefore lend me your ears is a synecdoche because in lending the ears the person is using part of the body to give the person making the statement his/her full attention.

Is metonymy a type of metaphor?

Both metonymy and metaphor involve the substitution of one term for another. In metaphor, this substitution is based on some specific analogy between two things, whereas in metonymy the substitution is based on some understood association or contiguity.

What is an example of a metonymy?

Metonymy is the use of a linked term to stand in for an object or concept. … Sometimes metonymy is chosen because it’s a well-known characteristic of the concept. A famous example is, “The pen is mightier than the sword,” from Edward Bulwer Lytton’s play Richelieu.

What are examples of oxymorons?

Common OxymoronsAct naturally.Alone together.Amazingly awful.Bittersweet.Clearly confused.Dark light.Deafening silence.Definitely maybe.More items…

How do you identify a synecdoche?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech in which a word or phrase that refers to a part of something is substituted to stand in for the whole, or vice versa. For example, the phrase “all hands on deck” is a demand for all of the crew to help, yet the word “hands”—just a part of the crew—stands in for the whole crew.

Is an example of synecdoche from the poem?

For example, someone might refer to her car as her “wheels,” or a teacher might ask his class to put their eyes on him as he explains something. When poets use synecdoche, they are often deploying it for a very specific purpose related to the overall meaning of the poem itself.

What are some examples of Litotes?

Litotes Examples in Common ExpressionsIt’s not rocket science. … He’s no spring chicken. … It’s not my first rodeo. … He isn’t the brightest bulb in the box. … You won’t be sorry you bought this knife set. … I don’t deny that it was wrong. … The trip wasn’t a total loss. … He doesn’t always have the best sense of direction.More items…

What does Metonomy mean?

: a figure of speech consisting of the use of the name of one thing for that of another of which it is an attribute or with which it is associated (such as “crown” in “lands belonging to the crown”)

Which is the best example of synecdoche?

Forms of SynecdocheThe word “sails” is often used to refer to a whole ship.The phrase “hired hands” can be used to refer to workers.The word “head” can refer to counting cattle or people.The word “bread” can be used to represent food in general or money (e.g. he is the breadwinner; music is my bread and butter).More items…

What is the most common form of metonymy?

A common form of metonymy uses a place to stand in for an institution, industry, or person. “Wall Street” is an example of this, as is “the White House” to mean the President or Presidential administration of the United States, or “Hollywood” to mean the American film industry.

What type of figurative language is this?

Types of Figurative LanguageSimile. A simile is a figure of speech that compares two unlike things and uses the words “like” or “as” and they are commonly used in everyday communication. … Metaphor. A metaphor is a statement that compares two things that are not alike. … Hyperbole. … Personification. … Synecdoche. … Onomatopoeia.

What is oxymoron in figure of speech?

An “oxymoron” is a figure of speech that has two contradictory or opposite words appearing side by side. So, basically, it’s a combination of two words that really have opposite meanings, but we use them, you know, regularly in sentences and phrases.