Quick Answer: How Do You Identify A Synecdoche?

What figure of speech is synecdoche?

Synecdoche is a rhetorical trope and a type of figurative speech similar to metonymy—a figure of speech that uses a term that denotes one thing to refer to a related thing.

Indeed, synecdoche is considered by some a type of metonymy..

Is a synecdoche a literary device?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech in which a part of something is used to signify the whole, or vice-versa. … As a literary device, synecdoche is a means for writers to avoid overusing words or phrases and creating an artistic form of expression.

What is an example of metonymy?

Metonymy is the use of a linked term to stand in for an object or concept. … Sometimes metonymy is chosen because it’s a well-known characteristic of the concept. A famous example is, “The pen is mightier than the sword,” from Edward Bulwer Lytton’s play Richelieu.

What are the 5 examples of synecdoche?

Forms of SynecdocheThe word “sails” is often used to refer to a whole ship.The phrase “hired hands” can be used to refer to workers.The word “head” can refer to counting cattle or people.The word “bread” can be used to represent food in general or money (e.g. he is the breadwinner; music is my bread and butter).More items…

What is a synecdoche in poetry?

Glossary of Poetic Terms A figure of speech in which a part of something stands for the whole (for example, “I’ve got wheels” for “I have a car,” or a description of a worker as a “hired hand”). It is related to metonymy. Poetry Magazine.

Is lend me your ears metonymy?

A familiar Shakespearean example is Mark Antony’s speech in Julius Caesar in which he asks of his audience: “Lend me your ears.” Metonymy is closely related to synecdoche, the naming of a part for the whole or a whole for the part, and is a common poetic device.

What is a metonymy easy definition?

: a figure of speech consisting of the use of the name of one thing for that of another of which it is an attribute or with which it is associated (such as “crown” in “lands belonging to the crown”)

What is the difference between a synecdoche and metonymy?

Synecdoche is a figure of speech referring to when a part of something is used to refer to the whole, such as in the phrase “all hands on deck,” where “hands” are people. … ‘Synecdoche’ is when a part of something is used to refer to the whole. ‘Metonymy’ is when something is used to represent something related to it.

What is the most common form of metonymy?

A common form of metonymy uses a place to stand in for an institution, industry, or person. “Wall Street” is an example of this, as is “the White House” to mean the President or Presidential administration of the United States, or “Hollywood” to mean the American film industry.