Quick Answer: How Much Is SSP 2020?

How much SSP will I get?

Statutory sick pay (SSP) is paid to employees who are too unwell and unable to work for a period of four days or more.

Currently, the SSP rate for employees who are eligible is £95.85 per week, for up to 28 weeks..

Who actually pays for SSP?

It’s paid by your employer for up to 28 weeks. This guide is also available in Welsh (Cymraeg). You must be eligible for SSP . You cannot get less than the statutory amount.

How many hours do you have to work to get SSP?

If you work (and aren’t self-employed), you’re legally entitled to get Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) as long as you: have started work with your employer. are sick for 4 full days or more in a row (including non-working days) earn on average at least £120 per week (before tax)

In what circumstances would an employee not qualify for SSP?

Employees do not qualify for SSP if they: have received the maximum amount of SSP (28 weeks) are getting Statutory Maternity Pay or Maternity Allowance – there are special rules for pregnant women and new mothers who do not get these payments.

Can my employer refuse to pay me SSP?

If you disagree with your employer’s decision on SSP, ask them to write down the reasons why not, your local HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) office can decide the matter. If your employer is refusing to pay you sick pay you’re due, this is classed as an ‘unlawful deduction from wages’.

Do part time workers get full SSP?

Yes, your employees should still receive statutory sick pay (SSP) even if they work part-time, providing they meet the qualifying criteria. It’s a legal requirement and if you don’t provide SSP, your part-time staff can claim it as an unlawful deduction of wages.